Artist Profile

Jagath Jayasooriya is a graduate in Fine Arts of university of Kelaniya(B.F.A) and hasmastered the ancient wall and cavepaintings of master artists.

He now grooms the ounger generation as a teacher of arts whilst dedicating his leisure time to copying ancient paintings as mode of preservation for the benefit of future generations.s

01-As The Model Artist1983-1984

National Museum(Colombo)

02-As The Artist Engaged in Copying Cave Temple Paintings1984-1985

cultural triangle of Central Cultural Fund

03-As an Graphic Artist Attached to Advertising Section1987-1989

National Youth Service Council

04-As an Artist in an Art Gallery1992-1994

Saudi Arabia

05-Held a Temple Paintings Exhibition1996

Kandy Museum

06-Worked as an Artist in an Art Gallery2000-2001

Maldives

07-Worked as a Teacher Until 2013

Kingswood College Kandy Sri Lanka

30 years experience in making all types of Artistic Creations relating to drawings and paintings.

Awards
Awards 2009
Presidential Gold Award Read More
Awards 2010
Presidential Gold Award Read More
Awards 2011
Presidential Gold Award Read More
Awards 2012
Presidential Gold Award Read More

Wall Painting Heritage of Sri Lanka

The history of Sri Lankan paintings and sculpture dates as far back as the 2nd or 3rd century BC. Th long history of Buddhist paintings in Sri Lanka falls into two clearly identifiable periods; the classical and the Kandyan. The classical period ranges from the 5th to the 12th/13th century and the Kandyan from 18th- 19th century.

Wall painting sites are found in high concentration in the central highlands surrounding Kandy, the last kingdom prior to colonial rule and in Western and Southern maritim provinces.

Decoration of the walls of the relic chambers of stupas has been very old practice in Sri Lanka as in the case of the Ruwanveliseya(2nd century BC). Once the relics were enshrined and the chamber was build over, no one would be able to see the paintings. Thus the purpose of painting neither decorative nor didactic, but perpetuation of veneration of Lord Buddha and his relics by the deities. Two classic examples of relic chamber paintings have been found in two ruined stupas, one from Mihintale (8th century) and the other from Mahiyangana (9th -11th century).

After the fall of the Polonnaruwa kingdom in the first half of the 13th century, the tradition re-emerged in mid 18th century as consequence of the resurgence of Buddhism in Kandy. Hundreds of new temples were erected, mostly with the patronage of the Kandyan kings or provincial chiefs. Degaldoruwa, Gangarama, Danagirigala, Suriyagoda, Madawala, Ridvihara and Dambulla provide the most mature example of this new trend of temple wall painting. Stylitically, there are remarkable differences between the early and the middle historical periods, popularly known as Kandya School of painting. Kandyan period paintings can be described as instructive, narrative and decorative. The differences in style are also reflected in the differences in paint materials and techniques of execution too.

Sri Lanka’s wall painting heritage dating from over two thousand years ago which continues today, offers a vivid and colourful aesthetic experience displaying the changes in moods and the modes of visual communication of a diverse society in a chromo- culture context.

After the fall of the Polonnaruwa kingdom in the first half of the 13th century, the tradition re-emerged in mid 18th century as consequence of the resurgence of Buddhism in Kandy. Hundreds of new temples were erected, mostly with the patronage of the Kandyan kings or provincial chiefs. Degaldoruwa, Gangarama, Danagirigala, Suriyagoda, Madawala, Ridvihara and Dambulla provide the most mature example of this new trend of temple wall painting. Stylitically, there are remarkable differences between the early and the middle historical periods, popularly known as Kandya School of painting. Kandyan period paintings can be described as instructive, narrative and decorative. The differences in style are also reflected in the differences in paint materials and techniques of execution too.

Sri Lanka’s wall painting heritage dating from over two thousand years ago which continues today, offers a vivid and colourful aesthetic experience displaying the changes in moods and the modes of visual communication of a diverse society in a chromo- culture context.

1-Engaged in The Line Dawings

2-Traditional Paintings

3-Modern and Abstract Art

4-Realistic Paintings

5-Interior Design